Garden Tuesday – Columbine

Columbine

Got shade?  Then you need columbine.  It is such a pretty and delicate plant.  The leaves almost look like a big clover plant and then these long delicate stalks of flowers shoot up in mid spring.

Seed pods

See these, these are the seed pods.  It is so easy to collect columbine seeds.  As soon as these pods dry and turn brown, but before they split open, I will snip them off.  Then I will place them in a baggie and dutifully label them and store them someplace for the winter, where I will never, ever find them again.  I expect that when I clean out the garage this summer, I will find 327 pounds of columbine seeds.

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Comments

  1. says

    That is so funny. I do the same thing. Yesterday I found 5 envelopes with seeds in them from flowers at my neighbor’s house a few years ago. I forgot all about them. I also have Columbine growing in a garden which gets mostly shade. They are beautiful and pop up every year. Mine are an orange color.

  2. says

    They are very pretty Pam! I’m like you, I would collect the seeds and put them in a “special place” where I would never find them-LOL.

  3. says

    so funny, they are like weeds in my yard now, I planted one packet of seeds years back, now they are everywhere, and also all the same color a pale purple and white….and they are everywhere!!! (but I still love their graceful stems and fragile looking flowers no matter where they grow.)

  4. says

    My parents are the same way with basil seeds! We would pick them off the plant every year. And then the next year. We would buy a new plant.

    Beautiful pictures!

  5. says

    LOL

    This is a very pretty and delicate looking one. I didn’t realise they are called Columbine in English. We call them Akelei (Aguilegia turned into Dutch). I have some with very dense, filled flowers (reddish pink) and ‘ordinary’ blue ones that do very well in the sun too.

    Another good shade tolerant one is Epimedium.
    In Dutch we call it Elfenbloem (Fairy flower).

  6. says

    Then I will place them in a baggie and dutifully label them and store them someplace for the winter, where I will never, ever find them again. I expect that when I clean out the garage this summer, I will find 327 pounds of columbine seeds.

    Honestly, you write some of the most humorous posts! You really should write a book, Pam! I was laughing so hard, my husband came into my office to see what was so funny. He agrees. Thanks for the laughs. :)