Garbure from the Supermarket

Garbure from Dorie Greenspan

Now that fall is here and the temperature is dropping, I’ve started my winter ritual of soup on Sunday.  Nothing makes me happier than the though of soup bubbling away in my slow cooker all day on a Sunday.  The aroma of soup mingling with the sounds of of football on the television and the glow of yellow-orange leaves through the windows. 

Since I am participating in the year of beans from Rancho Gordo, I pretty much add a cup of dried beans to every single soup I make.  So, I am extra happy when I find a soup recipe that actually calls for a cup of dried beans, as I did in Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table: More Than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours Garbure From the Supermarket.

As someone who makes soup practically every single Sunday from October to April, I have eaten a lot of soups, and I have to say that this is in my top 10.  It was wonderful.  It is totally loaded with vegetable and pork goodness.  I used a meaty ham bone and unfortunately didn’t have the optional duck leg and garlic sausage – which probably would have been utterly amazing.  Also, I skipped the turnips because I don’t like them!

But even without the optional ingredients – this was fabulous!

Garbure from the Supermarket (adapted by me for the slow cooker)

  • 1 C dried navy or cannellini beans
    2-3 pounds pork shoulder or 1 meaty hambone
    1 Tb veg oil or bacon fat
    1 lg Spanish onion, cut into 8-10 wedges
    2 leeks, white and light green parts, split, washed, and cut into 1″ long pieces
    2 shallots, thinly sliced
    2 garlic cloves, split, germ removed, crushed
    10 C chicken or vegetable broth
    2 lg carrots, peeled, sliced lengthwise, cut into 1″ long pieces
    2 celery stalks, cut into 1″ long pieces
  • 2 turnips, trimmed, peeled and quartered (omitted)
    2 med potatoes (Yukon golds are good) peeled and cubed
    1 sm green cabbage, cored and shredded
  • 1 duck leg (optional)
  • salt and fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 garlic sausage, cut into 1/2 inch thick slices (optional)

Rinse and sort the beans and place in slow cooker, cover with water by at least a couple of inches.  Soak overnight. 

In the morning, if using the pork shoulder, heat the oil or bacon fat in a skillet over medium high heat.  Brown on all sides.  Since I used a ham bone, I didn’t brown anything, just added all of the ingredients into the slow cooker, turned it on low and cooked for 10 hours.  But if I was using the pork shoulder and had browned it, I would have also sautéed the onion, leeks, shallots and garlic cloves to pick up a little of the pork fat flavor before adding to the slow cooker.

Makes about 10 servings

 

 

This will be my entry for Foodie Friday at Designs by Gollum!

 

This will be my entry for Souper Sundays (Soup, Salad, or Sammie) hosted by Deb at Kahakai Kitchen.

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Comments

  1. says

    Sounds wonderful. I would probably just make it with the pork or ham bone. Easy soup to adapt to the eating habits of your family.

  2. says

    After being without power for a couple of days, soup is sounding really good to me. There are a lot of nice ingredients in this one. But did you really use 10 cups of broth? That sounds like my size recipe, not yours!

  3. says

    i had to look up ‘garbure’–i’ve never seen that word before! this sounds like a terrific soup; the fact that it has your seal of approval makes me sure it is!

  4. says

    Hi Pam! As a fellow “Sunday soup” maker I’m so excited to try this when the weather cools down here in Florida (believe me, it does!). Question though, you’re soaking those beans overnight in the slow cooker insert, I assume simply for convenience. So do you drain the beans before adding the rest of the ingredients, or do you leave the liquid to act as a natural thickener for the soup? Thanks for sharing!

  5. Pam says

    Sarah – I leave the bean liquid in there. I know some people drain the soaking water from beans, but I never do.